The Museum is now open. The Monument will remain closed.

The History of Fort Griswold

On this spot Col. William Ledyard died. According to legend, he was stabbed with his own sword as he handed it to a British officer in the traditional form of surrender.

The large rock with a brass plaque marks the spot where British Major Montgomery died attempting to climb over the ramparts. He was “ran through” with a 10′ pike held by Jordan Freeman, a freed slave and Col. Ledyard’s body servant.

The salle port leads from the upper Fort to the covered way. These were built to provide cover for troops moving between the river and the Fort.

 

River Battery

The River Battery was originally shaped like the letter “W” when it was built in 1775. It was the first earthwork constructed in the park. In the 1840s it was totally rebuilt to mount cannon that fired 24 and 32 pound cannonballs. Two of these 32 pounders are located by the Memorial Gates. Later, the River Battery was again modified to mount heavy 8″ and 10 ” Rodman guns. What you see today is the red brick shot furnace and the powder magazine, both built in 1843.

On this spot Col. William Ledyard died. According to legend, he was stabbed with his own sword as he handed it to a British officer in the traditional form of surrender.